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while shielding his friends from a gang members spraying fire on a city bus. his friend is here today. marcus norris, hit in the face by a bullet that came through the wall of his house. thank god he survived. we are glad to have him here today. a true american hero who dedicated his life to serving his country and his community, killed by gang members with a straw purchase gun. i attended his funeral service. the officer's family is here, and his sister will testify today. there are many more in this room today whose lives and families have been changed by gun violence. i would like to ask the friends and family of the victims of gun violence to please stand. look about his room. understand that the debate we have before us has affected so many lives. thank you all for being here today. as we conduct this debate and honor your loved ones who are no longer with us, we know that we have to act. thank you for joining us at this hearing. senator cruz. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me say it is a particular honor to serve as ranking member on this committee with you and a particularly h
the equipment works and is accurate. -- -- and the car was not moving for 30 seconds. host: new york city is accused of rigging red lights in a class-action lawsuit. new york city is facing a class action lawsuit. the city accused of rigging lights to catch more drivers and right more tickets. -- write more tickets. isidor is a republican in washington, d.c. caller: in d.c. on new york avenue, as you entered the scene, they have the camera right there. if you are headed into maryland or coming into d.c., they have the gotcha camera. there are police on duty right after you run the red light camera to slow you down and give you a ticket even if you got the red-light ticket. what about the drug drivers? they're really not that concerned. it is a money machine. they're all over. host: do you think it makes use a for? caller: no. i'm not saying they could use speed bumps, and i don't think it makes us safer. if anything, i've seen it cause a lot of accidents, people slamming on breaks. host: story from the washington post. our question for you this morning is what you think of red-light camer
condition it is aimed, growing the economy, job creation. at about that time, a report from kansas city is devoted to entrepreneurship. that landed on my desk with recommendations about what washington might do in order to enhance the chances that the united states is and would remain a country of entrepreneurs. we took those ideas and began the process of drafting legislation. at about that time, senator wide and introduced himself and said i have an issue that might be of interest to you. would you care to team up with me? we spent a short amount of time analyzing the issues of sopa and pipa and realizing much of the job growth and the additional revenues to the treasury or occurring because of the innovation of the technology sector. certainly start of companies can be from the person that decides it wants to open a dry cleaners to the latest in technology that originates and we see here at this trade show. where the greatest success seem to be was in the innovation arena, that technology arena, and it appeared to me that government was about to make a decision that was going to limi
killed while shielding his friends from a gang members spraying fire on a city bus. his friend is here today marcus norris, hit in the face by a bullet that came through the wall of his house. thank god he survived. we are glad to have him here today. a true american hero who dedicated his life to serving his country and his community, killed by gang members with a straw purchase gone. i attended his funeral service. the officer's family is here, and his sister will testify today. there are many more in this room today whose lives and families have been changed by gun violence. i would like to ask the friends and family of the victims of gun violence to please stand. look about his room. understand that the debate we have before us has affected so many lives. thank you all for being here today. as we conduct this debate and honor your loved ones who are no longer with us, we know that we have to act. thank you for joining us at this hearing. senator cruz. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me say it is a particular honor to serve as ranking member on this committee with you and a particul
in the past. grow up. host: jim is in bay city, michigan. republican. good morning. caller: good morning. i want to talk about this gas prices at four dollars per gallon. we have a president that all he talks about is solar and wind mills and stuff like that. it is ridiculous. we have oil up to our ears hear in this country, and environmentalists are the only thing stopping refineries and anything that makes it all. i wish they would go back to their caves where they belong. host: from "wall street journal," "florida governor supports broader medicaid," saying he wants the state to expand medicaid under the federal health law, taking him the seventh gop governor to back expansion of medicaid, along with michigan governor rick snyder and ohio governor john kasich. mr. scott said that he supports a three-year expansion as long as the federal government agrees to keep its commitment to pay 100% of the cost during this time. he called a compassionate, commonsense step forward. president obama's original 2010 health law called for the us to pay 100% of the cost for three years." that is in "wall
traffic control towers and smaller cities. lawmakers have until march 1 until automatic spending cuts -- spending cuts are expected to take effect. this is a little less than an hour. >> i remember all of you from roll call. [laughter]you asked me all the3se dumb questions. [laughter] >> i just want to say that it is my pleasure, and clearly yours, to have with me today the secretary of transportation, ray lahood, who is here to speak with you about the impacts of sequester, if it comes to pass, on the american travel industry. and as we've talked about a lot, the indiscriminate, deep cuts will affect everyone, really, in america, and industries. and secretary lahood is here to discuss one aspect of that with you and to take some questions. and afterwards, i'll be here to take questions on other issues. i just want to remind you that we're on a slightly constrained time schedule. we have the president's meeting with national governors -- democratic governors, and then also the pool spray with the prime minister of japan. with that, i turn it over to secretary lahood. >> sequester will
with guns and are not in favor of gun control. if you grew up in a city, an urban environment with more guns and crime, you're probably less in favor of guns and more in favor of gun control. if that holds true, there is not going to be a huge majority in congress for gun-control. seems like it will be pretty split. host: including democrats? caller: including democrats, although a smaller number. some of the ones who were gun owners said that boehner is in favor of gun control. he said he was a gun owner, but that he believed that some gun controls, particularly background checks, are important. there were 120 republicans that own guns, only 46 democrats told us that they own guns. 76% of congress answered our questions. host: why did people not answer your question? caller: they gave a variety of reasons. we had about 60 people total applying by saying that they would not talk about it. several said that it was safety reasons, that they did not think it was appropriate to talk about their security. several of them said that they did not want to tell burglars that they had guns, because bur
in the city in ohio and if i did not have a public pension i think that would have been working for the rest of my life. an earlier caller mentioned pensions being affected, but when this crisis happened, you had to have some faith in the economic system. when you look at what happened during the depression, we came out of it. i figured at that time that the country would eventually come out of it. where would we have been five years later? nowhere. i have a tendency to side with the republicans, but at the same time i still think that some of those protections were warranted for people. into the system you get so many people on fox news, knocking down public pensions. the average person in ohio makes about $26,000 per year. all of that talk about locking down those pensions is just bad, really bad, they should stop it. host: what is your pension look like? tell us about it. caller: it is not a bad tension. they did change this, it has changed. you are able to retire at 55, but they changed it to 57. you need 25 years in the system to do that. most people will go for 30 years in ohio. i am a
of poverty in the next decade alone. city kids are going back to work. farmers are having their own online dating service. the most talked about super bowl commercial, courtesy of the late harvey, was a heartwarming tribute to the american farmer. what is that kenny chesney song? "she thinks my tractor is sexy"? there is some truth to that. agricultural issues are, if not sexy, increasingly important. i'm glad to be here. it is appropriate that we are here today. it turns out that it was february 21, 1865 -- 148 years ago today, that the u.s. patent office issued a patent. i will not give you a pop quiz. it was labeled john deere plow. the implement sketched out could have easily been labeled one of the most important inventions in history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast iron with smooth innovation, it opened up swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for my hometown to exist. beforehand, tilling an acre took a full 24 hours. afterward, as little as five. every toil ended another assumption of what the land could produce. it is not
to happen, rather than arbitrary cuts. host: a lot more stories about your largest city, detroit, and its economic issues. what is the future of that city? guest: detroit has many great things going on, young people moving in, some great projects going on. the challenge in detroit is city government. it is not a recent issue. there are good people in the recent administration. this goes back for decades. the city government is unsustainable in terms of its finances. it needs to provide better services. we have had a review team looking at the finances. one of the question it asks is, do we need to take additional steps to get detroit's finances together? oddly partner with the city to get that happening? detroit will be a great city again. caller: what is happening in detroit is disgraceful. you run for office. you get in, you get that power, and all good ideas run out of your mind. it seems like all of the government, including state, is bought and sold to the highest bidder. you start off with a decent salary, and then when you all come out of office, your millionaires. who pays? it is
new york city. caller: good morning. what you just read in the article, it makes the case why religious institutions ought not to be tax-exempt and get all the tax breaks that they do. they are using their tax breaks to hire lawyers that are costing the taxpayers even more money to basically just have a normal secular society. this issue of birth control, the rest of the world is laughing at us that we are even controverting over it. it should not even be an issue on the table. again, the tax-exempt status for religious institutions, i do not know if there are organizations that are trying to repeal this tax-exempt status, but i never really heard of a program on c- span about it, but these organizations, these religious institutions -- it is the tax breaks they get. host: nick from fairview, tennessee. on the independent line. caller: this is a ploy. socialists like the kennedys and obama, they will vilify -- if they cannot get it right, kruschev said, we will take two steps forward, and one step backward. we no longer live under a constitutional republic. liberals claim that
is personal. i've seen the tent cities firsthand. i have spoken with the women. i have counseled the victims and witnessed the scars of indignation and pain. i feel the anguish in my bones. but i also feel the hope. let's work together to ensure that no woman in haiti, no woman in this hemisphere or in this world has to bear the indignity of sexual violence. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from north carolina, ms. foxx, for five minutes. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. the constitution of the united states of america was written to put in statute the limits of government's authority over citizens. it does not bestow rights or permit freedoms upon american people. rather, it delimits what government of the people, by the people and for the people can and cannot do. since well before our country's founding, americans have exercised the right to keep and bear arms, a right formerly protected by the ratification of the second amendment in 1791. as a life-long defender of seco
, etc. if every city and mitropoulos got hit hard on home building and retail and began to look up there traded sectors and began to look at the advance manufacturing sectors and basically would say, what do they need to survive and prosper? and do we have a skills problem? do we have an infrastructure problem? do we have an innovation break down, essentially between research and development, a prototype, development? this will basically follow the health of the cluster and particularly with small and medium-sized firms, what are they doing to essentially help lee is relatively small firms? -- help these small firms.?? >> john, said a funny thing. you said no matter how much the government screws up, caltech will still be caltech and m.i.t. will still be m.i.t. outside the beltway, it is a different reality and you talked about public and private partnerships at the local level. can you talk about why they are so important and maybe share your story about how you see the power partnerships? >> i did not mind it versus the real world. i spend most of my time with the company's seen
was there is this requirement at the time, gun safety class, which was five hours long, and you could not teach it in the city because it requires an hour at the range so you had to leave the city. there were really no restrictions. it was open ended on who could teach it, where they could teach it. it was all these men teaching it in these homes. it made me feel very unsafe. i couldn't find an instructor. in the end the city council, because of reading all this, exposing all this, the city made it virtually impossible for people to get guns in the city, the city council passed a law this year that took away that requirement, that five-hour class. and a couple other small requirements, but there's still 11 steps to gun ownership in washington which is only down from 17 when i did it. host: emily miller, who is charles sykes and what's his role in the gun-buying process in d.c.? guest: well, charles sykes is the one legal gun dealer in washington, d.c., and he's been doing it for years. he does not buy and sell. he has a very unique role which is transferring the guns, because federal law says you have to have
the most of the guns had rested because the government of the city of new orleans did not give a never mind and left the guns in an exposed condition and in rather extreme humidity that they experience there, so the guns or ruined. oh, too bad. host: what statement did gun owners of america make after sandy hook? guest: following sandy hook, gun owners of america was pretty outraged. we pointed out that the politicians have to accept some blame for what happened, for having facilitated what happened in sandy hook. all of the mass murders in our country in the last 20 years with one exception have occurred in legally-required gun-free zones. these are places where you just are not allowed to legally have a gun. and whether it was a mall in utah, whether it was a theater in colorado, or whether it was at this school -- typically it has been at schools, that is where these mass murders occurred. our response that was let's get rid of the laws that require people to be disarmed, precisely in places where the mass murders have occurred. host: harrison, nebraska, good morning. caller: hello, the
top oggray and one moment one area is secure and others are not as secure. we know cities such as san diego and el paso count themselves having made great improvement and one might use the term operational control, because there are border stations. we know there are 1,993 miles of border, 651 miles of fencing and one might make the argument that the unfenced area is less secure. i would argue against that. one of the things that we need to ensure that we allow the border patrol to do is to advise us of how they believe using the right resources they can effectuate a secure border. but it is always moving. one of the issues that should be prominent in this such as 2004 in a member of this committee, we provided the answer to the original request by the border patrol and that is equipment. that was the year we presented all the helicopters, all of the jeeps, the lap tops, the night goggles and enhanced equipment. we know that those kinds of resources are not the only answer to border security. what i would like to see is to match your outcomes with the use of new technology, but tament
sisters and for 16 dwhreerns columbus city council. most recently he served local republicans as county and district chair. he was my dear friend. i got to know ted when i ran for office, he said he was happy to see me but his boys had a swim meet and i'd have to go there. i went and probably learned more about swimming than politics. in his quiet but direct way, he shed -- showed me where it he set his priorities and when it came time for me to have a wife and children where i should set mine. ity try to do that. mr. rokita: i will miss his friendsship, counsel and good example. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. olson: mr. speaker, on april 12, 1981, the space shuttle columbia blasted off ointo space station to launch america's space shuttle program. she would complete 28 missions with over 300 days in space. as every american know
of thoughtfulness that needs to happen, rather than arbitrary cuts. host: a lot more stories about your largest city, detroit, and its economic issues. what is the future of that city? guest: detroit has many great things going on, young people moving in, some great projects going on. the challenge in detroit is city government. it is not a recent issue. there are good people in the recent administration. this goes back for decades. the city government is unsustainable in terms of its finances. it needs to provide better services. we have had a review team looking at the finances. one of the question it asks is, do we need to take additional steps to get detroit's finances together? -- working better? oddly partner with the city to get that happening? detroit will be a great city again. that is critically important for the future of michigan. caller: what is happening in detroit is disgraceful. look. you run for office. you get in, you get that power, and all good ideas run out of your mind. it seems like all of the government, including state, is bought and sold to the highest bidder. you start off
. in the city of milwaukee, they have involved 112 private schools in the program, nearly 5000 students. $6,500 per student. the total cost, i assume annual, 164 -- $154 million. >> it depends on how you look at it. milwaukee past its first voucher program in 1989. it served as a model for a lot of other state voucher programs across the country. it serves over 24,000 students. there was a study that came out a couple years ago by the state that found vouchers were performing at the same level as traditional public schools in milwaukee. a more recent study out of the university of arkansas showed positive results for students with vouchers. i believe the program has been shown to offer pretty strong results in terms of graduation rates, but the milwaukee voucher program has been held up as the model, and the opinions of it will break down exactly along the lines of a voucher programs all over. clearly, governor walker believes if parents are buying into this program and it is proving popular, it will prove popular in other school districts around wisconsin. we will see if the legislature is
students across this country and in the city of chicago walk out and they see the promise of downtown, do they see their future as part of that opportunity or do they see a different future? and that is how we measure success. the two places where we can bridge that gap between where our kids are today and the promise of this city and the promise that this city holds are in the classroom and in the home. president obama understands that to connect all americans to that vision of a promising future requires that we create real ladders of opportunity. i am pleased he has come home to expand on that vision. ladies and gentlemen, let's give the president a chicago welcome. [playing "hail to the chief"] [applause] >> hey, chicago. hello, chicago. hello, everybody. hello, hyde park. [cheers] it is good to be home. it is good to be home. everybody have a seat, y'all relax. it's just me. y'all know me. it is good to be back home. a couple of people i want to acknowledge -- first of all, i want to thank your mayor, my great friend rahm emanuel for his outstanding leadership of the city and this ki
, small businesses budgets, cities budgets, churches budgets, schools budgets. my state of north carolina budgets. but washington does not. instead, year after year budgetless washington spends every single cent of the money it takes from the american people and $1 trillion more. not since 2009 has the democrat senate bothered to pass a budget. and not since 2010 has president obama submitted his plan for a budget on time. when you don't plan, it's easy to overcommit, and when a country overcommits year after year after year, it ends up $16.4 trillion in debt. that doesn't just rob our future, it hurts americans looking for jobs today. while government spending ballooned $8.5 -- 8.5 million more people have given up looking for work since 2009. mr. speaker, the unchecked spending has got to stop. it's time to get this government on a budget. it's time for the president to submit a credible plan. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from connecticut seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute. revise and
to expand the voucher program. in the city of milwaukee, they have involved in the voucher program 112 private schools. almost 35,000 students. the total costs overall is 150 $4000. 30 eight percent comes from public school funds. another 62% of general revenue in the state. -- 38% comes from public school funds. another 62% comes from general revenue in the state shou. guest: acer does a model for a lot of voucher -- it served as a model for a lot of voucher programs around the country. states found that students performed at about the same level as traditional public schools in milwaukee. in a recent study out of the university of arkansas shows positive results for students with vouchers. i believe the program has been shown pretty strong results in terms of graduation rates. the milwaukee voucher is held up as a model. the opinions of it will break down pretty much along the lines of voucher programs all over. governor walker believes that parents are buying into the program and it is proving popular. it might prove popular in other school districts around wisconsin. host: we are t
bureaucracy can afford to bear the brunt of these cuts, not our military, not communities like lake city or mayo or newberry or middleberg, florida. i'm working with my friend from georgia, congressman doug collins, on the new freshmen regulatory reform working group, to help show exactly where some of these cuts are and help businesses do what they do best, they grow the economy and they create jobs, bringing in more revenues to our government. we need and we will show the president and the american people that we can cut wasteful spending without hurting kids, our seniors and that we can make responsible cuts that do not put our national security at risk. and not add to the heavy tax burden of hardworking americans that they're already carrying. it was a shame that the president and the senate have avoided working with the house in real budgeting process. i look forward to working with all my colleagues on resupporting -- restoring faith to the american people and bringing order back to this process. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. westmoreland: i t
's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-authorizing section 5 in 2006, building on the leadership of my predecessor, the honorable barbara jordan, who
one thing to it. i really believe that exposing kids from inner city to countryside to suburbs to science and math teachers who have actually graduated in the field they teach. we can do this. this is the primary -- the primary a number one recommendation of the gathering storm report and have little happened to it. so the idea is very simple. we need to deploy a set of scholarships to attract young men and women to go to college, to major in computer science or electrical engineering or physics or chemistry and at the same time be certifiable as k through 12 teachers. secondly, and i hope i'm not getting a little too much to the political side, i'm a big believer that we need to adopt voluntary standards, voluntary standards across our state in stem fields just as we have in mathematics and in english. these standards need to emphasize learning science by doing it. project base. bringing the excitement, the sense of discovery. this is what is going to attract more kids to look at things like the maker movement. it attracts kids from all over the sose yo economic spectrum. look
, they do not allow -- they put locks on doors from the inside. the change the handlebars city cannot -- so you cannot chain them up. we have an emergency alert systems. that actually run drills and have created a threat assessment teams were the have faculty members, members a lot -- members of the mental health community involved in identifying problem students and making changes they need. we have done a good deal in terms of improving our school security. we have done nothing in terms of improving or firearm security and making sure guns are not falling into the hands of those who should not have them. he host: the nra raising in excess of $1 million, one of the best fund-raising efforts ever. they're also seeing a record number of new number -- new memberships to the nra. does that surprise you? guest: people are drawn to both sides. we have seen similar significant donation increases, the chapter's starting up. it has been a phenomenal what portion of support we have seen. two months later, we try to get back to people now. keep up. -- keep it up. that is great. when people see these
city tennessee, or public in line. caller: yes. i want to make a comment. i think obama and handle -- hagel percent ace two state solution. is that correct or not? guest: at some point, that is their ultimate goal, yes. caller: don't you think that would make the situation worse, they are trying to divide it? the bible says that god is against that. dividing the land of israel. guest: i think that is a whole separate show on what to do in that region. it is far too complex to get into at this point. senator hagel has been very clear that he supports the president's approach to the region. host: talk about when senators are getting prepared. do they get a briefing book? how is that done? guest: they get some of that from the administration. the committee takes a set -- slightly different approach. the committee staff will also look at that. it is not the committee's job to rubber stamp the nominees. they will take their own look and prepare their own materials for specific members that they asked but also generally for the committee. certainly in an instance like this, i think the r
and producing in ge-sun city work -- ge- sensitive markets. we will look at monitoring, maintaining the. t of publicly held germ classes, because there is concern about that. -- the purity of publicly-held germ classes, because there is concern about that. as will mitigate the risk associated when folks want to do things a little bit differently, in the same general space. it is part of managing risk. the long-term risk we will face, with a changing climate -- i will conclude with this. there is no question that the climate is changing. we recently furnished to assessments from usda on the impact of changing climates on agriculture and forestry. the conclusions were pretty obvious. higher temperatures lead to more intense weather patterns. more intense weather patterns lead to greater stress for crops and livestock. and increase tree mortality. we at usda have a responsibility to figure out ways in which we can mitigate the risks of something we really cannot control. when it happens, we cannot control when a drought occurs. we cannot control when a horrible tornado hits, or when flooding
. as optometrist opening a new practice in a struggling mill city he was strung by how few of his young patients had plans to go to college. mr. kennedy: when he asked why, the response was a simple answer, my pearnts condition afford it. a at the time the average cost of tuition was a couple hundred dollars a year. dr. franken did the math he figured if each of the 30,000 town's household gave $1 they could send every single senior in the city to college. is dollars for scholars was born. he began collecting as little as $1 from neighbors to provide scholarships. four decades later, what began as a card table operation became scholarship america which has awarded $3 billion in scholarships across 38 states. at 92 years old, dr. franken continues to fight for the city he loves and the students he made his life work. i recognize him and his wife charlotte -- i congratulate him and his wife charlotte on recognition they deserve. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman rise? >> address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without o
costing them a lot of money. in new york, it is more about the city of new york than the state of new york. the smoking bans which did not help -- did not hurt businesses. when everybody knew the rules, all the bad restaurants shifted over. -- all the restaurants shifted over. this allows a more sophisticated way of dealing with the socialized costs so will we can share them more easily. if you create rules that everyone can follow, they will all do the right thing. otherwise, people will cherry pick and profits accordingly. i personally think each state will have to find their own way of going on this path. it is worth putting this in a document. asked mike bloomberg if this is good or bad. if we're talking about the impact of sodas comment that was worth the risk politically to get that conversation going. there are many other states. fantastic improvement in some of the major urban areas like philadelphia. when you look at this places, they are simple things done well. real food, social infrastructure, mich.-as its 4x4 tool. what little to do all of view, it ought to be about second opi
a bipartisan group of city elected officials, business leaders, and community advocates gave me a message to bring back the congress. i'm proud of their joint effort and i'm proud of their service to our communities. i consider it a privilege to deliver their message. in our state, we are concerned that congress will turn the clock back on arizona's hard work and progress. we are worried about hardworking families losing their jobs. as the granddaughter of a world war ii veteran and proud sister of a gunner's mate in the u.s. navy today, i remember every day that it is our moral duty to do right by the men and women in uniform who risked their lives to keep us safe. avoid the see questions tration should not be about partisanship or finger pointing. it's about jobs. it's that simple. i stand with the dean of our state's delegation, senator john mccain, when i say this sequester will be devastating for arizona. it's bad for hardworking americans and it turns a blind eye to my state's proud effort and proven perseverance. i affirm my commitment to working with anybody who is willing to put
of the inner cities, the towns. i live in a well-known mennonite area, and they are coming up here. why? pennsylvania welcomes them with open arms, will not turn them in to immigration, and i will tell you one thing -- it will lead to either a race war or a revolution. host: mark, we got your point. let's get your response from deepak bhargava. guest: that call illustrates that there are deep anxieties about immigration and the changing face of america. in a few short years this will be a color nation. part of the republican stance is shaped by the election results were an overwhelming number of latinos voted for the president. there clearly is no path for a political party that is not willing to speak to the needs and concerns of the entire population. the anxiety that you see, we see younger americans much more supportive of a path to citizenship, older americans less willing to see that happen -- this is part and parcel of the change we are going through as a country. the president's point, that we cannot think of this as them against us is critical. we are all american, this is part
johnson air force base, cherry point, u.s. coast guard air station, elizabeth city, and others will not be ready to defend and serve our country at a moment's notice if we allow this to happen. in my state alone, cuts to the department of defense budget will result in 22,000 civilian d.o.d. staff being furloughed, reducing the gross pay by $117 million. base operation funding would be cut by $136 million, severely reducing military readiness, putting our country at peril. in closing, mr. speaker, i implore my colleagues to work together to prevent the impending sequestration so that we may prevent devastating cuts to our vital infrastructure. we are slowly but surely building our economic recovery and our nation can literally, literally not afford to be knocked down again by an inability to compromise. please, let's get it done. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina yields back. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from arkansas, mr. cotton, for five minutes. mr. cotton: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pr
of the largest cities and in some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online, and that is a pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content, a good percentage of that comes from the united states. there is an appetite, clearly. how much of that will translate to a cable channel again where some of these folks are dedicated online streamers' is a challenge, but we hope we can provide interesting and freshen up content and have some people cross over. host: how will the recent purchase expand the american audience? who will you be able to reach now? >> -- guest: it is an estimated 50 million viewers. obviously it is a great leap forward and a great deal. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the americas. this just opens some eyeballs to us, and we hope it will give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it for those who have not seen it, and again, provide a platform for the core audience we already have. host: it is a 24-hour global news network carried in places like new york
the curvature of the earth and hitting new york city on this video with that very odd background music playing. but it just shows an attitude, and i think that we cannot stand idle and tell ourselves that further sanctions have no prospect of success, especially when we saw how effective for that brief period of time where the treasury department was so concerned about the counterfeiting of $100 bills that they actually forced deployment of those financial sanctions on those institutions which the north koreans used in order to have access to hard currency. we saw at that time the result and the protests from north korea, and the result inside north korea when there was not the money to pay the military or carry out the types of programs that they do in terms of their missile and nuclear testing. so it's time to be honest with the american people that frankly our current north korean policy is not working. it hasn't worked for a long time. going forward, we need to move away from that failed north korean policy to one with energy and creativity and focus, and i think we need to learn from what
and dinners. and my governor will in louisiana must have taken 20 trips to different states and cities during the republican convention that was going on and he still lost. i'm independent. i didn't really care who won. i'm independent. i feel like as republican is for the rich white your democrat for the poor blacks independents is for everybody. i don't care. the -- host: the question the specific question for our guest? guest: the specific question is why do you have to cut spending that's going to help the poor and help the people that's in need in health care and help people that get into trouble and all that? guest: one of the thing that is you'll see if you look at the budgets of states across the country, certainly my states, most across the country over the last many years the amount of money that we spend on health care specifically which i think is what the caller was asking about has been increasing significantly. and it's a challenge. and because of that and the fact that we have limited resources at the state level unlike at the federal level where they can just essentially borr
permission to the other side of the city. [laughter] second, i started to pay special attention to the plaques on the buildings that recommend -- that recognize the united states of america for lending a hand in rebuilding. i was proud. the marshall plan, imf, and other organizations led by the united states are evidence of our ability to make the right decisions at the right time, taking risks today in the interest of tomorrow. we now face a similar crossroads. we can be complacent or competitive as markets bloom in every corner of the world. with or without us. we could be there to help plant the seeds or we can see the power to others. given the chance to lead a second great american century, we must not just look to the american landscape today. look at the days to come. we must marshal the courage that define the the marshall plan so that we might secure in the future freedom. let's remember the principles of jefferson's time. looking to independence echoing in our time. america's national interest is in leading strongly and it still in doers in this world. let me leave you
, the city to hold 10% your entire working life for your retirement. between jobs and layoffs -- and i have always been fortunate to make as much as college graduates, but between the jobs and layoffs throughout my work life and the clinton era taxes and everything -- i'm not blaming him, i thought he was a good president even though i am a republican, i just want someone's opinion on people my age and why we have so little put away. we are the generation of all the crises and the tail end of that . host: before we get a response from paul taylor, are you still with us? caller: >> i am. host: what has your savings patterns been over the last couple years? caller: i had to quit contributing to my 401k's just to get by with the rising cost of living from 2006 to present i went four years without a pay increase from my employers because they were in a financial struggle as well with the economic hit in 2007 and slow growth to 2009. we finally got a pay increase last year because of somewhat of a comeback in our industry. host: thank you. that age group is critical when it comes to your 401k pl
interests in the city. i'd like to have you go ahead and put that chart up. and leave it up during the course of this hearing because each member up heres a a copy of this. there are certain things that happened we all know. we know on may 22 the red cross was hit with an r.p.g. they left town. we know on june 11, the british ambassador's motorcade was attacked by an r.p.g. they left town. we know on april 10 the united states convoy was hit by an i.e.d. and on june 6, the u.s. consulate was attacked with a bomb and many, many other things. but we stayed. we didn't leave. while i understand the state department has primary responsibility for the protection of american diplomats around the world, i also understand that the defense department plays an important role -- supporting role to this effect. i expect our witnesses to explain today why, given the clear indication -- indicators tanned warnings, threats to the united states interests in benghazi and throughout the north africa were growing was the -- was the defense department not placed on a heightened alert status or adequate
as shopping reminders of the especial -- epidemic in cities. this unspeakable tragedy is affected by countless tragedys that take place in our streets that pass too often unnoticed and that too frequently decimate the lives of our most vulnerable sit zernings our children. every loss is shearting. and inexplicable, yet each one is an outrage. this is why it has affected citizen, hard broken parents and advocates that we are sworn to protect. it's time for each of us to steal our reserve and renew our commitment to respond to this senseless violence with renewed individual lens. we are determined to work with organizations like this one to build a bipartisan consensus for taking decisive action to end begun violence. and we will not rest until we've done everything in our power to prevent future tragedies like the one that took place at sandy hook elementary school. now, of course, there will never be a simple, one size fits all solution for addressing any challenge of this magnitude and confronting all of its underlying causes but we must not allow the size or the complexity of this problem to
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